Multimedia

Video Collections: From The Vault Video Collection


All the videos are hosted on the Infinite History website. Please click on the title or the thumbnail to watch the video.

Harvard and MIT Rehabilitation Engineering Center with Professor Robert W. Mann (1987)

Harvard and MIT Rehabilitation Engineering Center with Professor Robert W. Mann (1987)

Technology Day 2001 - "Origins and Beyond: Our Place in the Cosmos"

Technology Day 2001 - "Origins and Beyond: Our Place in the Cosmos"

The 2001 MIT Technology Day takse place on June 9, 2001, on the theme "Origins and Beyond: Our Place in the Cosmos." Featured speakers include Eric S. Lander, “The Human Genome and Beyond;” Claude R. Canizares, “The Origin of the Universe;” Maria T. Zuber, “Probing the Origin of the Planets from Spacecraft; ” Charles R. Marshall, "On Palaeontology."The event is chaired by MIT President Charles M. Vest.

"Computer For Apollo" (1965) - Science Reporter TV Series

"Computer For Apollo" (1965) - Science Reporter TV Series

This 1965 “Science Reporter” television program features the Apollo guidance computer and navigation equipment, which involve less than 60 lbs of microcircuits and memory cores. Scientists and engineers Eldon Hall, Ramon Alonzo and Albert Hopkins (of the MIT Instrumentation Laboratory) and Jack Poundstone (Raytheon Space Division in Waltham MA) explain and demonstrate key features of the instruments, and detail project challenges such as controlling the trajectory of the spacecraft, the operation of the onboard telescope, and the computer construction and its memory. The program was presented by MIT in association with WGBH-TV Boston, and hosted by MIT reporter John Fitch; it was produced for NASA. MIT Museum Collections.

"Food For Space Travelers" - Science Reporter TV Series (1966)

"Food For Space Travelers" - Science Reporter TV Series (1966)

This 1966 “Science Reporter” television program showcases the challenges of ensuring proper nutrition for astronauts on prolonged journeys. The film covers metabolic and caloric consumption in particular conditions of space flight, the special challenges posed by microgravity, issues of food storage and waste management, and more. Guest speakers include scientists Paul LaChance (Manned Spacecraft Center, Houston TX), Doris Calloway (University of California at Berkeley, Department of Nutritional Sciences), food technologist Donald Wescott and dieticist Mary Klicka (U.S. Army Labs, Natick MA). The program is presented by MIT in association with WGBH-TV Boston, and hosted by MIT reporter John Fitch; it was produced for NASA. MIT Museum Collections.

"How Fast Is Fast?" (1994) - Harold “Doc” Edgerton

"How Fast Is Fast?" (1994) - Harold “Doc” Edgerton

Take a look at the life and effect that Harold "Doc" Edgerton had on MIT and the world, in "How Fast is Fast?" produced by the Edgerton Foundation in 1994. The film presents a wide-ranging compilation of film clips and interviews. Doc Edgerton demonstrates all sorts of effects of strobe photography that allow us to see what happens at speeds too fast to be discerned by the naked eye. Some well-known examples include a flying bullet that shatters a lightbulb, the motion of a hummingbird's wings, a cat lapping up milk, falling liquid drops. Produced by MIT Video Productions for the Edgerton Foundation. 1994.

"Landing on the Moon" (1966) - Science Reporter TV Series

"Landing on the Moon" (1966) - Science Reporter TV Series

This 1966 “Science Reporter” television program details the development and construction of the Lunar Excursion Module (LEM), the only vehicle of the three Apollo spacecraft modules that actually lands on the moon. Project engineer Thomas Kelly gives a tour of the LEM at Grumman Aircraft in Long Island, NY, and demonstrates the LEM Automatic Checkout System, while test pilot Robert Smyth demonstrates the lunar landing simulator via an electronic computer-controlled model of the Moon. The program is presented by MIT in association with WGBH-TV Boston, and hosted by MIT reporter John Fitch; it was produced for NASA. MIT Museum Collections.

"Looking Back on The Bomb" (1963) - Science Reporter TV Series

"Looking Back on The Bomb" (1963) - Science Reporter TV Series

Vannevar Bush looks back over the years to share his views on some of the great events of his time. He touches on such topics as the role of a science advisor to the nation, the future of the computer, the gap between science and the public, his views on the two cultures of C.P. Snow, and his experiences as the organizer, guiding spirit and driving force of the American scientific efforts during World War II. Interviewed at his Belmont home in 1963 by John Fitch '52 for the MIT/WGBH collaborative television program, “Science Reporter”. Film to HD transfer courtesy of MIT150. MIT Museum Collections.

"Returning From the Moon" (1966) - Science Reporter TV Series

"Returning From the Moon" (1966) - Science Reporter TV Series

This 1966 “Science Reporter” television program tackles the challenges of getting the Apollo Command Module safely back from space through the atmosphere to Earth – one of the most forbidding hurdles of the Apollo program. William Brooks (Langley Research Center, Hampton VA) demonstrates techniques of testing the effects of high temperatures on substances proposed to shield the module on its re-entry at 25,000 mph. Edward Offenhartz (AVCO, Lowell MA) discusses the uses of ablation to dissipate the extreme heat and protect the module’s occupants. Sandy Stubbs (Langley) explains the variety of module designs and their relative abilities to sustain different kinds of impact. The program is presented by MIT in association with WGBH-TV Boston, and hosted by MIT reporter John Fitch; it was produced for NASA. MIT Museum Collections.

"View From The Road" (1958) - Kevin Lynch

"View From The Road" (1958) - Kevin Lynch

A film short produced by Professor Kevin Lynch BCP '47 produced this high-speed film as part of his studies into the theory of city form and of human perceptions of the city.

13th Killian Award Lecture #1 (1985) - Philip Morrison, "The Fruits of the Tree of Astronomy"

13th Killian Award Lecture #1 (1985) - Philip Morrison, "The Fruits of the Tree of Astronomy"

Professor Phillip Morrison delivers the first of two lectures for the James R. Killian, Jr. Faculty Achievement Award titled "The Fruits of the Tree of Astronomy," on April 3, 1985. Established in 1971 as a tribute to MIT's 10th president, the Killian Award recognizes extraordinary professional accomplishment by an MIT faculty member. The winner delivers a lecture in the spring term.

14th Killian Award Lecture #1 (1986) - Franco Modigliani, “The Life Cycle Hypothesis”

14th Killian Award Lecture #1 (1986) - Franco Modigliani, “The Life Cycle Hypothesis”

Professor Franco Modigliani's lecture titled “Life Cycle Hypothesis of Savings" is the first of two talks he gave for the James R. Killian, Jr. Faculty Achievement Award Lecture series. Kresge Auditorium, April 2, 1986. Established in 1971 as a tribute to MIT's 10th president, the Killian Award recognizes extraordinary professional accomplishment by an MIT faculty member. The winner is asked to deliver a lecture in the spring term.

14th Killian Award Lecture #2 (1986) - Franco Modigliani, “Application of the Life Cycle Hypothesis to Policy Issues”

14th Killian Award Lecture #2 (1986) - Franco Modigliani, “Application of the Life Cycle Hypothesis to Policy Issues”

Professor Franco Modigliani's lecture titled “Application of the Life Cycle Hypothesis to Policy Issues" is the second of two talks he gave for the James R. Killian, Jr. Faculty Achievement Award Lecture series. Kresge Auditorium, April 9, 1986. Established in 1971 as a tribute to MIT's 10th president, the Killian Award recognizes extraordinary professional accomplishment by an MIT faculty member. The winner is asked to deliver a lecture in the spring term.

15th Killian Award Lecture (1987) - Mildred S. Dresselhaus, "Adventures in Carbon Research"

15th Killian Award Lecture (1987) - Mildred S. Dresselhaus, "Adventures in Carbon Research"

Institute Professor Mildred S. Dresselhaus delivers the first of two talks for James R. Killian, Jr. Faculty Achievement Award, titled "Adventures in Carbon Research", on April 1, 1987. Established in 1971 as a tribute to MIT's 10th president, the Killian Award recognizes extraordinary professional accomplishment by an MIT faculty member. The winner is asked to deliver a lecture in the spring term.

16th Killian Award Lecture #1 (1988) - Jay W. Forrester, "The Common Foundation Underlying Physical and Social Systems..."

16th Killian Award Lecture #1 (1988) - Jay W. Forrester, "The Common Foundation Underlying Physical and Social Systems..."

Jay W. Forrester delivers the first of two talks for the James R. Killian, Jr. Faculty Achievement Award, titled "The Common Foundation Underlying Physical and Social Systems: Information Sources and Methods for Modeling Social Systems," on March 30, 1988. Established in 1971 as a tribute to MIT's 10th president, the Killian Award recognizes extraordinary professional accomplishment by an MIT faculty member. The winner is asked to deliver a lecture in the spring term.

16th Killian Award Lecture #2 (1988) - Jay W. Forrester, "The Common Foundation Underlying Physical and Social Systems..."

16th Killian Award Lecture #2 (1988) - Jay W. Forrester, "The Common Foundation Underlying Physical and Social Systems..."

Professor Jay W. Forrester delivers the second of two lectures for the James R. Killian, Jr. Faculty Achievement Award, titled “The Common Foundation Underlying Physical and Social Systems: Applications of Systems Dynamics," on April 6, 1998. Established in 1971 as a tribute to MIT's 10th president, the Killian Award recognizes extraordinary professional accomplishment by an MIT faculty member. The winner is asked to deliver a lecture in the spring term.

17th Annual Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Celebration (1991)

17th Annual Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Celebration (1991)

The Seventeenth Annual Dr. Martin Luther King. Jr. Celebration takes place on Jan. 18, 1991 and features Dr. Benjamin Hooks as the keynote speaker. Four students also present a youth perspective on the significance of the celebration in their own lives.

1993 MIT Commencement Address - Carlos Salinas de Gortari

1993 MIT Commencement Address - Carlos Salinas de Gortari

Dr. Carlos Salinas de Gortari, Constitutional President of the United Mexican States, gives the 1993 MIT Commencement Address on May 28, 1993.

1994 MIT Commencement Address - His Highness Karim Aga Khan IV

1994 MIT Commencement Address - His Highness Karim Aga Khan IV

His Highness Karim Aga Khan IV, Spiritual Leader of the Shia Ismaili Muslims, gives the 1994 MIT Commencement Address. The Aga Kahn is the first Muslim to be the guest speak at the MIT Commencement exercises.

1996 MIT Commencement Address - Albert A. Gore

1996 MIT Commencement Address - Albert A. Gore

Vice President Albert A. Gore gives the commencement address as Guest Speaker for the 1996 MIT Commencement Exercises, on June 7, 1996.

1997 MIT Commencement Address - Kofi Atta Annan

1997 MIT Commencement Address - Kofi Atta Annan

Kofi Atta Annan MS '72, Seventh Secretary-General of the United Nations, is the Guest Speaker at the 1997 MIT Commencement Exercises, on June 6, 1997.

1998 MIT Commencement Exercises - William Jefferson Clinton

1998 MIT Commencement Exercises - William Jefferson Clinton

William Jefferson Clinton, 42nd President of the United States, delivers an address as a Guest Speaker at the 1998 MIT Commencement Exercises, held on June 8, 1998.

1999 MIT Commencement Exercises - Raymond and Thomas Magliozzi, Guest Speakers

1999 MIT Commencement Exercises - Raymond and Thomas Magliozzi, Guest Speakers

Raymond and Thomas Magliozzi, hosts of the National Public Radio Series "Car Talk", are the commencement speakers on the occasion of the 1999 MIT Commencement Exercises. Commentaries by Prof. Samuel J. Keyser (Special Assistant to the Provost) and Warren Seamans (Director Emeritus of the MIT Museum ) offer the historical context to this special academic ceremony.

20th Killian Award Lecture (1992) - Noam Chomsky, "Language: The Cognitive Revolutions"

20th Killian Award Lecture (1992) - Noam Chomsky, "Language: The Cognitive Revolutions"

Professor Noam Chomsky delivers the 20th annual James R. Killian, Jr. Faculty Achievement Award and Lecture, titled "Language: he Cognitive Revolutions," on April 8, 1992. The Killian Award was established in 1971 to recognize extraordinary professional accomplishments by full-time members of the MIT faculty. A faculty committee chooses the recipient from candidates nominated by their peers for outstanding contributions to their fields, to MIT and to society.

22nd Annual Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Celebration (1996)

22nd Annual Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Celebration (1996)

The 22nd Annual Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Celebration on the theme "With Liberty and Justice for All," held on February 16, 1996, features Dr. Julius L. Chambers as keynote speaker. Student speakers include Kareem Howard '99, Simonetta Rodriguez 'G and master of ceremonies Yvette Johnson '96. Martin Luther King Jr. Leadership Award recipients are MIT senior Matt Turner ('96), Prof. Leon Trilling and Dr. Shirley Ann Jackson '68, PhD '73.

24th Killian Award Lecture (1996) - Daniel Kleppner, "Views From a Garden of Worldly Delights"

24th Killian Award Lecture (1996) - Daniel Kleppner, "Views From a Garden of Worldly Delights"

Dr. Daniel Kleppner, the Lester Wolfe Professor of Physics and associate professor of the Research Laboratory for Electronics, delivers the 1995-6 James R. Killian Faculty Achievement Award lecture titled "Views From a Garden of Worldly Delights" in Huntington Hall (Rm. 10-250). Established in 1971 as a tribute to MIT's 10th president, the Killian Award recognizes extraordinary professional accomplishment by an MIT faculty member. The winner is asked to deliver a lecture in the spring term.

2nd Annual Martin Luther King, Jr. Celebration – Walter J. Leonard (1975)

2nd Annual Martin Luther King, Jr. Celebration – Walter J. Leonard (1975)

Following an invocation prayer and a musical performance, Walter J. Leonard delivers the keynote address for the second annual Martin Luther King, Jr. Breakfast Celebration at MIT. Leonard, who at the time was Special Assistant to Harvard University President Derek Bok, delivers his speech titled: “Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.: A Friend Remembered” at Kresge Auditorium in early February 1975. MIT Museum Collections.

A Solution to Computer Bottlenecks (1963)— Science Reporter TV Series

A Solution to Computer Bottlenecks (1963)— Science Reporter TV Series

Associate Director of the MIT Computation Center, Fernando J. Corbató discusses the challenges of resolving computer bottlenecks that were becoming an increasingly significant issue around high-speed computers, and the complex problems involved in setting up a workable time-sharing program. Interviewed by John Fitch for the "Science Reporter" TV series presented by MIT and produced by WGBH. MIT Museum Collections.

Apollo 11 Launch 1969

Apollo 11 Launch 1969

This silent home movie taken by Major Alexander P. de Seversky, the Russian-American aviation pioneer and inventor, shows a personal view of the Apollo 11 launch. MIT Museum Collections.

Artificial Skin—Ioannis V. Yannas(1982)

Artificial "Skin" - Ioannis Yannas (1982)

MIT Professor of biological engineering Ioannis V. Yannas discusses his pioneering work in developing the first synthetic skin, in collaboration with John F. Burke at Massachusetts General Hospital during the 1970s and early 1980s. Burke and Yannas invented a skin substitute composed of collagen and polymers protected by a layer of silicone.

Artificial Intelligence: Learning and the TEIRESIAS Program (1981) - Randall Davis

Artificial Intelligence: Learning and the TEIRESIAS Program (1981) - Randall Davis

Professor Randall Davis (MIT Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science), a seminal contributor in the field of knowledge-based systems, gives a talk titled "Artificial Intelligence: Learning and the TEIRESIAS Program", on June 16, 1981.

Automatically Programmed Tools (1959)— Science Reporter TV Series

Automatically Programmed Tools (1959)— Science Reporter TV Series

This 1959 MIT Science Reporter television program describes the APT project, a novel system for the computerization of numerical control being developed at the new Electronic Systems Laboratory by colleagues John Francis Reintjes and Douglas Taylor Ross. Reintjes and Ross discuss their work using the WHIRLWIND I computer to develop an automatic programming system for numerical control in two dimensions known as APT (automatically programmed tool). MIT ESL worked on APT with US Air Force support and in cooperation with Aerospace Industries Association. The project marked MIT's first government/industry/university joint effort. Program hosted by Robert S. Woodbury. MIT Museum Collections.

Big City 1980

Big City 1980

MIT professor and architectural engineer John E. Burchard '23 accompanies the program host, Garry Moore, as they consider what the urban future holds: How and where we will live in 1980, twenty years in the future? They take Philadelphia and Brasilia as examples to illustrate how a city could be transformed. The hour-long program was filmed as part of the CBS "Tomorrow" series on occasion of MIT’s Centennial in 1961. Film to HD transfer courtesy of MIT 150. MIT Museum Collections.

Big Magnets (1961) - Science Reporter TV Series

Big Magnets (1961) - Science Reporter TV Series

Dr. Benjamin Lax discusses the future of the nascent National Magnetic Laboratory at MIT (of which he is the director) in fields such as biomagnetics, along with MIT Professor Francis Bitter, research biologist Dr. H. Fernandez-Moran (Massachusetts General Hospital) and Max Swerdlow (Air Force Office of Scientific Research). Interviews conducted by Dr. Bert Little for the MIT/WGBH collaborative Science Reporter TV program. Film to HD transfer courtesy of MIT 150. MIT Museum Collections.

Bountiful Grant of the Sea (1972) - Athelsan Spilhaus

Bountiful Grant of the Sea (1972) - Athelsan Spilhaus

Professor Athelsan Spilhaus '33, inventor of the bathythermograph, gives the inaugural lecture, titled "Bountiful Grant of the Sea," for the MIT Sea Grant Program Convocation celebration on September 27, 1972. Introductions by Alfred Kiel (Director of the Sea Grant Program and Dean of Engineering at MIT) and Robert Abel (Director of the National Sea Grant Program). MIT Museum.

Camp Technology (1936)

Camp Technology (1936)

This vintage film from 1936 shows the daily routines of work (and play) at MIT's surveying camp for civil engineering students. It was known affectionately as "Camp Technology" and for years was held at a site on the shores of Gardner Lake near East Machias, Maine. MIT Museum Collections.

Charles M. Vest Inauguration (1991)

Charles M. Vest Inauguration (1991)

On May 10, 1991, Charles M. Vest was inaugurated as the 15th president of MIT during a ceremony in Killian Court. President Vest served the Institute with distinction over the next 14 years, leading MIT through a period of significant change and growth. Chuck, as he was affectionately known by his MIT colleagues, is currently serving as president of the National Academy of Engineers.

Churchill at MIT: The Mid-Century Convocation of 1949

Churchill at MIT: The Mid-Century Convocation of 1949

For its 1949 Mid-Century Convocation, MIT invited Winston Churchill to give the keynote address in front of a crowd of thousands - an historic event for MIT and the international community. This short video, produced in 1999, includes excerpts of Churchill's rousing speech interspersed with historical photographs from the MIT Museum collections and personal reminiscences from MIT participants such as Tom Tooley, President of the Senior Class of 1949.

Compton Lecture (1998) - John H. Gibbons, "Governance of Science and Technology: Theory, Myth, Reality"

Compton Lecture (1998) - John H. Gibbons, "Governance of Science and Technology: Theory, Myth, Reality"

For his second of three Karl Taylor Compton Lectures Dr. John H. Gibbons delivers a talk on October 22, 1998 titled “The Governance of Science and Technology: Theory, Myth, Reality”, in which he discusses the role of the government in influencing technological research and development, and reviews recent national science and technology initiatives. Introduction by John Deutsch. The Compton Lecture series was inaugurated in 1958 with the intention to bring "some of the great minds on the world scene" to the MIT campus.

Compton Lecture (1999) - John H. Gibbons, "Sustainable Growth: Fantasy or Vision?"

Compton Lecture (1999) - John H. Gibbons, "Sustainable Growth: Fantasy or Vision?"

Dr. John H. Gibbons presents the last of three lectures delivered during the 1998-1999 academic year as part of the Karl Taylor Compton Lecture series. His talk is titled "Sustainable Growth: Fantasy or Vision?”. April 26, 1999.

Coretta Scott King Keynote Address at 20th Annual Martin Luther King, Jr. Celebration (1994)

Coretta Scott King Keynote Address at 20th Annual Martin Luther King, Jr. Celebration (1994)

Coretta Scott King gives the keynote address for the 20th annual Martin Luther King, Jr. Celebration at MIT, held on February 11, 1994. Her remarks begin at 42:19. The day's theme is “The Movement for Economic and Social Justice: 1994 and Beyond." Mrs. King is introduced by MIT President Charles M. Vest.

Coretta Scott King Procession at 20th Annual Martin Luther King, Jr. Celebration (1994)

Coretta Scott King Procession at 20th Annual Martin Luther King, Jr. Celebration (1994)

On February 11, 1994, Coretta Scott King is escorted to Kresge Auditorium during the traditional silent march at the 20th annual Martin Luther King, Jr. Celebration at MIT.

ds = dQ/T and YOU! (1961)—MIT Centennial Round Table

ds = dQ/T and YOU! (1961)—MIT Centennial Round Table

A roster of luminaries including Jerome Wiesner, Jerrold Zacharias and John Burchard of MIT, discuss the significance of science and technology together with Raymond Aron of the Université de Paris-Sorbonne, Isadore Rabi of Columbia University and Sir Eric Ashley of Cambridge University. Introduced by MIT President Julius A. Stratton and hosted by Charles Collingwood, this round table discussion was filmed as part of the "Tomorrow" television series produced by CBS Television Network for MIT on occasion of MIT’s Centennial in 1961. Film to HD transfer courtesy of MIT150. MIT Museum Collections.

EDM A Magic Slate (1962)—Science Reporter TV Series

EDM A Magic Slate (1962)—Science Reporter TV Series

Norman Taylor (of ITEK Corp. previously with MIT's LIncoln Lab) demonstrates an innovative electronic drafting machine (EDM) that allows engineers to produce computer-based graphic images using a "light pen." Taylor is interviewed by John Fitch in 1962 as part of the "Science Reporter" television series presented by MIT and produced by WGBH. Courtesy of the MIT Museum. © MIT and WGBH.

Ethics in Engineering and Science Forum (1988) - Sylvia Robins, Doug Ross and Ralph Nader

Ethics in Engineering and Science Forum (1988) - Sylvia Robins, Doug Ross and Ralph Nader

Panel discussion at the Ethics in Engineering and Science Forum discussing issues of whistle-blowing and ethics with Sylvia Robins, Doug Ross and Ralph Nader (Caroline Whitbeck, moderator); held on April 14, 1988.

Full Day (1958)—Kevin Lynch

Full Day (1958)—Kevin Lynch

Professor Kevin Lynch BCP '47 produced this time-lapse film showing 24 hours as viewed from the Memorial Drive side of the MIT campus, looking across the Charles River towards the city of Boston, as part of his studies into the theory of city form and human perceptions of the city. MIT Museum Collections.

Gyorgy Kepes Interview (1988)

Gyorgy Kepes Interview (1988)

Gyorgy Kepes, founder of MIT's Center for Advanced Visual Studies (CAVS), is interviewed at his home in Cambridge, MA on the occasion of a California Polytechnic show on art and science, in December 1988. The interview explores the role of art in transforming one's inner self, a process that leads to art transforming the outer world as well.

Harold “Doc” Edgerton—How Fast Is Fast?

Harold “Doc” Edgerton—How Fast Is Fast?

Take a look at the life and effect that Harold "Doc"Edgerton had on MIT and the world in How Fast is Fast?. The film presents a wide-ranging compilation of film clips and interviews. Doc Edgerton demonstrates all sorts of effects of strobe photography that allow us to see what happens at speeds too fast to be discerned by the naked eye. Some well-known examples include a flying bullet that shatters a lightbulb, the motion of a hummingbird's wings, a cat lapping up milk, and falling liquid drops. Produced by MIT Video Productions for the Edgerton Foundation in 1994.

History of the Strobe (1984) - Harold 'Doc' Edgerton

History of the Strobe (1984) - Harold 'Doc' Edgerton

Harold "Doc" Edgerton examined his life’s work in this popular talk titled, "The History of the Strobe." Talk was delivered in Room 34-101 for the Electrical Engineering and Computer History Lecture Series on November 27, 1984.

Hypothetical Risk: Cambridge City Council's Hearings on Recombinant DNA Research (1976)

Hypothetical Risk: Cambridge City Council's Hearings on Recombinant DNA Research (1976)

The film Hypothetical Risk, The Cambridge City Council's hearings on DNA Experimentation in Cambridge was recorded in June 1976 at City Hall, Cambridge, Massachusetts. Mayor Alfred Vellucci and city councillors Saundra Graham and David Clem are among those to question a panel of scientists including Mark Ptashne (Harvard professor of biochemistry and molecular biology), Daniel Branton (chairman, Harvard Safety Committee), Maxine Singer (National Institute of Health biochemist), Ruth Hubbard (Harvard professor of biology) and Jonathan King (MIT associate professor of biology). Produced by the MIT Oral History Program for the Recombinant DNA History Project in 1978.

Inauguration of MIT's 14th President Paul E. Gray (1980)

Inauguration of MIT's 14th President Paul E. Gray (1980)

A week of celebration accompanied the inauguration of MIT's 14th president, Paul Edward Gray ScD '60, in July 1980. This video compilation shows the solemn as well as playful events surrounding the historic occasion, from formal speeches and symposia lectures to campus picnics and a presidential balloon ride.

Infra-Red Dating Game (1996)

Infra-Red Dating Game (1996)

In the mood for fun, students and faculty put a twist on the popular 1960s TV show The Dating Game during Charm School Activities in IAP 1996. Called the Infra-Red Dating Game (aka Love Lab), this MIT-inspired game lets a student bachelorette question three bachelors (fellow MIT students) who are hidden from view. But unlike the Dating Game, the Love Lab lets the bachelorette see an infrared image of the bachelor. Aided by science, the bachelorette narrows her sights on the target and, by the end of the questioning period, picks her date. MIT Professor John Hansman serves as infrared consultant. Taping took place live in the Center for Advanced Educational Services, Building 9, Room 450. This video includes multiple contestants. At times, the roles reverse and bachelors quiz bachelorettes.

Julius A. Stratton—Founders' Philosophies (Full Version)

Julius A. Stratton—Founders' Philosophies (Full Version)

MIT President Emeritus Julius A. Stratton delivers an illuminating talk titled "Founders' Philosophies," as the first in a series of nine presentations by various MIT luminaries for an IAP event called "They Were There," offered during January 1976. Quoting from a number of key documents in MIT's history, Stratton provides a detailed assessment of the scope and vision of William Barton Rogers, founder of the Institute, and a comprehensive historical context to the climate of the times. Courtesy of MIT Museum.

Landing on the Moon - Science Reporter TV Series (1966)

Landing on the Moon - Science Reporter TV Series (1966)

This 1966 Science Reporter television program details the development and construction of the Lunar Excursion Module (LEM), the only vehicle of the three Apollo spacecraft modules that actually lands on the moon. Project engineer Thomas Kelly gives a tour of the LEM at Grumman Aircraft in Long Island, NY, and demonstrates the LEM Automatic Checkout System, while test pilot Robert Smyth demonstrates the lunar landing simulator via an electronic computer-controlled model of the Moon. The program is presented by MIT in association with WGBH-TV Boston, and hosted by MIT reporter John Fitch; it was produced for NASA. MIT Museum Collections.

Lester C. Thurow and Carl Sagan - "Management in the Year 2000" (1988)

Lester C. Thurow and Carl Sagan - "Management in the Year 2000" (1988)

Here are presented highlights from the Spring 1988 "Symposium on Management in the Year 2000" featuring the new dean of the MIT Sloan School of Management Lester C. Thurow and Cornell professor Carl Sagan. Moderated by Steven Starr. The symposium for the MIT Program for Senior Executives was held at Endicott House.

Looking Back on The Bomb (1963)

Looking Back on The Bomb (1963)

Vannevar Bush looks back over the years to share his views on some of the great events of his time. He touches on such topics as the role of a science advisor to the nation, the future of the computer, the gap between science and the public, his views on the two cultures of C.P. Snow, and his experiences as the organizer, guiding spirit and driving force of the American scientific efforts during World War II. Interviewed at his Belmont home in 1963 for the MIT/WGBH collaborative television program, Science Reporter. Film to HD transfer courtesy of MIT150. MIT Museum Collections.

Making Electrons Count (c.1950)

Making Electrons Count (c.1950)

This early 1950s film provides a fascinating tour of the Whirlwind I computer facilities at MIT by illustrating daily routines, problem-shooting and step-by-step procedures that computer programmers and other users go through at the research center. Features Henry Kolm and Robert C. Merton. Sponsored by the Office of Naval Research.

Mid-Century Convocation (1949) - Winston Churchill Keynote Address

Mid-Century Convocation (1949) - Winston Churchill Keynote Address

At MIT's Mid-Century Convocation held in 1949—described as "an intellectual festival of monumental proportions"—Sir Winston Churchill gave a rousing keynote address titled “Mid-Century Convocation on the Social Implications of Scientific Progress." The speech was considered one of his most renowned speeches on the emerging Cold War. The convocation was held at the Boston Garden with an estimated audience of 13,000. The film opens with Karl T. Compton (outgoing MIT President) and Bernard M. Baruch, who introduces Churchill. Read the full text of Churchill's speech at the MIT Institute Archives and Special Collections. Film to HD transfer courtesy of MIT150. MIT Museum Collections.

Midnight Concert in Lobby 7 (1979)

Midnight Concert in Lobby 7 (1979)

This beautiful midnight concert of Bach music held in Lobby 7 in December 1979 showcases the musical talents of the MIT community. Presented by the MIT Chamber Players and conducted by Prof. Marcus Aurelius Thompson. First piece: Brandenburg Concerto N. 5 by J. S. Bach: Jonathan Friedman '83 (flute), Tim Morgenthaler '81 (violin), Mark Kroll (harpsichord), Jeremy Grace '83 (cello). Second piece (at 24:30): Magnificat by J. S. Bach: Andrea Bradford (soprano), Jeffrey Gall (alto), Karl Dan Srenson (tenor), Robert Honeysucker (bass), Barbara Knapp (oboe d'amore), Luz Martinez-Miranda '83 (harpsichord), Jeremy Grace '83 (cello), Ira Moskowitz (bass), Tom Stephenson (bassoon), and members of the MIT Choral Society and friends. December 1979.

MIT Centennial Procession (1961)

MIT Centennial Procession (1961)

This silent film shows the formal procession of MIT professors and other dignitaries gathering for the academic assembly at the MIT Centennial celebrations in 1961. MIT president Julius A. Stratton and his wife Kay are seen chatting with friends and colleagues. Note that the marshals are wearing newly designed 15th century Venetian-style hats for the first time in an MIT academic procession. Film to HD transfer courtesy of MIT 150. MIT Museum Collections.

MIT Experimental Music Studio (c. 1973)

MIT Experimental Music Studio (c. 1973)

Interview with Barry Vercoe, MIT associate professor of music and director of the MIT Experimental Music Studio; Prof. Richard Hoffman of the Oberlin Conservatory of Music offers commentaries. Marcus Thompson (MIT associate professor of music) performs on the viola in a studio and on the Kresge Auditorium stage. Circa 1973. MIT Museum Collections.

MIT Family Weekend Convocation (1989): “Footprints in the Rock” and "The 2.70 Introduction to Design Contest"

MIT Family Weekend Convocation (1989): “Footprints in the Rock” and "The 2.70 Introduction to Design Contest"

MIT Family Weekend (Oct. 21, 1989), featuring speakers Phillip Morrison, Phyllis Morrison, Paul E. Gray and Harry West. In the first presentation titled "Footprints in the Rock" Philip and Phyllis Morrison demonstrate the essence of scientific inquiry through a detailed account of how the Olduvai Gorge hominid footprints were discovered and how careful methods of interpretation brought out their full meaning and significance. The Morrisons emphasize how in science the process of discovery and understanding is just as important to comprehend as the results themselves. The second speaker, Professor Harry West, gives an introduction to the 270 design contest. West came to MIT as a Kennedy Fellow; his research focuses on the design of robotics and kinetics. The event Includes presenters Bill Hecht, and introductory speakers Paul and Priscilla Gray.

MIT Laser Spectroscopy Laboratory: Laser Angiosurgery (1987)

MIT Laser Spectroscopy Laboratory: Laser Angiosurgery (1987)

The MIT George R. Harrison Spectroscopy Laboratory features in this 1987 video presentation of cuttting-edge research, conducted in conjunction with the Cleveland Clinic Foundation, on the applications of laser angiosurgery to the specific problem of atherosclerosis.

MIT OpenCourseWare Press Conference - April 4, 2001

MIT OpenCourseWare Press Conference - April 4, 2001

On April 4, 2001, MIT President Charles Vest leads a press conference to announce the establishment of MIT's OpenCourseWare (OCW), the web-based program to provide free access to MIT course content, including lecture notes, problem sets, exams and videos. Vest describes OCW as a "natural marriage of American higher education and the capabilities of the World Wide Web," and a reflection of MIT faculty's "deeply ingrained sense of service" and "incredible idealism." The discussion covers issues of access, costs, copyright, motivations and expectations, and the long-term implications of the project. Other panelists include Prof. Steve Lerman (Chairman of the Faculty), Prof. Hal Abelson (EECS) and Prof. Dick Yue (Associate Dean of Engineering). For current information, visit OCW.

MIT Project Athena: A Computer-Aided Teaching System (1984)

MIT Project Athena: A Computer-Aided Teaching System (1984)

Project Athena was a pioneering experiment in education developed at MIT in the 1980s to integrate computers into the university system and provide access to powerful software to the community at all levels. This 1984 promotional video shows how the campus-wide network of over 2500 computer workstations is designed to enhance intuitive understanding and perspective on engineering problems, such as visualizing the relationships between theory and experiment. Featured speakers include professors Bill Unkel, Jeffrey Steinfeld, Terry Ring, Julian Szekel, and Roger Mark.

MIT Red Tailed Hawks (Spring, 2004)

MIT Red Tailed Hawks (Spring, 2004)

In early spring 2004, a mating pair of red tailed hawks set up residence on the MIT campus in front of Building 9. These hawks were reported to have been building nests on the MIT campus for several years. They nested in a spot where Academic Media Production Services could capture and share a peek at a hawk's life, providing a 24x7 live webcast that we delivered that came to be known as the MIT Hawkcam. People all over campus and from around the US were watching as the two hawk chicks grew up. Particularly interesting is feeding time when the mother hawk brings the hungry chicks an assortment of delicious rodents.

MIT's Building 20: The Magical Incubator (1998)

MIT's Building 20: The Magical Incubator (1998)

MIT’s Building 20, built in 1943, was called the “Magical Incubator” because over the course of its long history it housed a range of laboratories involved in some of the most important and ground-breaking developments in science and technology, from acoustics to radar. This short piece was produced for the March 1998 commemoration that gathered former tenants of the building before its demolition in 1998 to make way for the Ray and Maria Stata Center. An exhibit showcasing its history can be seen in the Stata Center.

MITV "Election '76" (11/1/1976)

MITV "Election '76" (11/1/1976)

The MITV NEWS student-run program on Nov. 1, 1976 features a debate on the imminent national elections chaired by Nancy Lukitsh with guest speakers Jeff Pressman (MIT), Walter Dean Burnham (MIT) and Chris Arterton (Yale). The program begins with footage of the presidential candidates Jimmy Carter and Gerald Ford, and also includes clips from the debate between John F. Kennedy and Richard Nixon. The panel also views a pre-taped interview by Nancy Lukitsh of political journalist Edwin Diamond.

MLK Celebration 2001—Full Ceremony

MLK Celebration 2001—Full Ceremony

The 27th annual Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Celebration took place on February 8, 2001. Speeches featured then-MIT President Charles M. Vest and Harvard Law School professor Lani Guinier, who delivered the keynote address, "Confronting the Gap: Building and Sustaining Inclusion.” The 2001 MLK Leadership Award Recipients included Harvey Gantt '70, Professor Wesley Harris, and Desiree Ramirez '02.

One Part in a Trillion (1964)—Science Reporter TV Series

One Part in a Trillion (1964)—Science Reporter TV Series

In this 1964 Science Reporter program, we take a tour of the nuclear reactor at the U.S. Army Materials Research Agency in Watertown, MA, and learn how it is being used as a scientific research tool to detect and fingerprint infinitesimal impurities in metals. Homer Priest (director of the Watertown Research Laboratory) traces how knowledge of molecular structures has grown over time, and discusses the implications of nuclear reactor research for industries such as semi-conductors. Also interviewed are Jack O'Connor, Chief of the Nuclear Reactor Division, and research physicist John Antal. Produced by MIT and WGBH. Film to HD transfer courtesy of MIT150. MIT Museum Collections.

Phi Beta Epsilon (1927)

Phi Beta Epsilon (1927)

This silent film shows life at the Phi Beta Epsilon fraternity at MIT during the 1926-1927 academic year. Filled with silly gags and activities—from house-cleaning to house parties and sports events—the film reflects life at MIT in the 1920s. Courtesy of MIT Museum.

Philip Morrison and Lester Thurow - Symposium on Forecasting the Future Across Industries (1988)

Philip Morrison and Lester Thurow - Symposium on Forecasting the Future Across Industries (1988)

Physicist Philip Morrison (Institute Professor) and economist Lester Thurow (Dean of the Sloan School of Management) address senior executives at the "Symposium on Forecasting the Future Across Industries: Tech/ Science/ Art/ Economics/ Politics" held at MIT's Endicott House, on April 30, 1988. Introduced by Steve Starr.

Reading by Ear (1966) - Science Reporter TV Series

Reading by Ear (1966) - Science Reporter TV Series

In this 1966 Science Reporter television program, MIT Electrical Engineering Professor Samuel Mason discusses cutting-edge technology being used to focus on the challenges of providing education to visually impaired people through improved sensory aids. In his laboratory, Mason demonstrates an experimental system that uses a computer that can read aloud in spelled speech from an ordinary printed text. Hosted by reporter John Fitch '52. Produced by MIT and WGBH. MIT Museum Collections.

Ronald E. McNair Building Dedication, Center for Space Research (1986)

Ronald E. McNair Building Dedication, Center for Space Research (1986)

On Dec. 5, 1986, MIT dedicated Building 37, home to the Center for Space Research and part of the aeronautics and astronautics department, to Ronald E. McNair PhD ’76. During McNair's second flight in space, he lost his life along with six other astronauts when the space shuttle Challenger exploded. This special ceremony features speakers Cheryl M. McNair, Ronald McNair’s widow, McNair's thesis supervisor Michael S. Feld '63, David S. Saxon (Chairman of the MIT Board of Trustees), Shirley A. Jackson PhD '73, astronaut Charles F. Bolden Jr., and MIT President Paul E. Gray '54. The MIT Gospel Choir concludes the ceremony.

Sailing by Computer (1966)—Science Reporter TV Series

Sailing by Computer (1966)—Science Reporter TV Series

Novel approaches to ship design using state-of-the-art computers are presented in a 1966 interview of Halsey Herreshoff, instructor at the MIT Department of Naval Architecture in charge of research in ship model testing, in this "Science Reporter" TV program co-produced by MIT and WGBH. Interview by John FItch. Courtesy of the MIT Museum. © MIT and WGBH.

Scenes from Two Programs about Victor Weisskopf (2002)

Scenes from Two Programs about Victor Weisskopf (2002)

Scenes from two programs about Victor Weisskopf by Glorianna Davenport and Richard Leacock, presented on the occasion of a memorial event in 2002 celebrating his life. The first excerpt is taken from the film Remembering Niels Bohr, 1885-1962. The second excerpt is from the film Victor Weisskopf: Understanding Quantum Physics.

School of Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences 50th Anniversary Celebration (2000)

School of Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences 50th Anniversary Celebration (2000)

The fiftieth anniversary celebration for arts and humanities programs at MIT features several symposia and a medal ceremony held on Oct. 6 and 7, 2000. The newly renamed School of Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences (HASS) is introduced by Dean Philip Khoury. The symposia speakers include, from MIT, Steven Pinker, Rosalind Williams, Noam Chomsky. Ellen T. Harris, Anita Desai, John Harbison, John W. Dower, Pauline Maier, Robert Solow and Suzanne Berger, as well as special HASS awardees Dame Gillian Beer (Cambridge University). Louise Gluck (Williams), Kenneth Arrow (Stanford) and Hilary Putnam (Harvard). The event culminates with performances of gamelan music and jazz, and classical music conducted by Frederick Harris and Dante Anzolini, and concludes with the announcement of Kenan E. Sahin's seminal donation to HASS.

See It Now: Jay W. Forrester and the Whirlwind Computer  (1951)

See It Now: Jay W. Forrester and the Whirlwind Computer (1951)

MIT Professor Jay W. Forrester talks about his work on the WHIRLWIND Project, during an interview with Edward R. Murrow for CBS News on Dec. 16, 1951.

Soft Machine (1984)—Architecture Machine Group

Soft Machine (1984)—Architecture Machine Group

In this video, the Architecture Machine Group (a think-tank laboratory that preceded MIT's current Media Lab) introduces the Interactive Graphical Robot System and Video Slidathon. As the computer states, “The man-computer interface has evolved from the teletypewriter to workstations, that accomplishes a spatial metaphor for data management. In this experimental system the interface is metaphorically a person, an alter ego who provides conversational access to several conventional computer programs.” Produced in1984 by Patrick Purcell.

Susan Hockfield Inauguration (2005)

Susan Hockfield Inauguration (2005)

On May 6, 2005, Dr. Susan Hockfield was inaugurated as the 16th president of MIT. Hockfield, the first woman and the first life scientist to lead MIT, committed the Institute to sustaining its commitment to intellectual openness, as well as to increasing the numbers of women and underrepresented minorities in academia. During the ceremony, she also announced a new initiative on energy and the environment. Established in September, 2006, the MIT Energy Initiative (MITEI) is an Institute-wide initiative designed to help transform the global energy system to meet the needs of the future.

Take Me Back to Tech

Take Me Back to Tech

This film, which takes its title from a popular MIT song featured at the beginning of the piece, offers a narrative history of MIT from its Back Bay beginnings to the mid-1970s, compiled from a range of vintage film clips from the MIT film archives. It was produced in 1976 for the MIT Historical Collections by David R. Karp ’78 as an undergraduate UROP project, in cooperation with the MIT Alumni Association. Narrated by Theodore Wood, Jr. (MIT Professor of Literature and American Studies). Courtesy of MIT Museum.

Technology 1934

Technology 1934

This silent film, which offers a vintage tour of the Institute, was produced by MIT in 1934 “for all who might be interested in knowing more about the Institute and its significance in the world of Science, Art and Engineering,” for alumni, “to awaken happy memories of undergraduate days,” and for prospective students, to showcase life at MIT “as seen through the eyes of a boy of pre-college age." It documents students and instructors conducting research in laboratories and in the field as well as daily activities beyond the academic realm. MIT notables who make an appearance include Karl Compton, Harold Edgerton, George Owen and James Libby Tryon. Film to HD transfer courtesy of MIT150. MIT Museum Collections.

Technology Day 1993 - "Riding the Wave of Innovation: The Ocean and MIT"

Technology Day 1993 - "Riding the Wave of Innovation: The Ocean and MIT"

MIT's 1993 Technology Day, on the theme "Riding the Wave of Innovation: The Ocean and MIT," takes place on June 4, 1993. Speakers featured in the morning symposium include Sylvia Earle, "Exploring the Ocean with Unmanned Vehicles;" Robert Spindel, "Measuring the Ocean Environment;" Carl Wunsch ’62, "Effects of the Ocean on Global Climate;" William Koch ‘62, "Technology for the America’s Cup." Francis Ogilvie is the moderator. The event concludes with Paul Gray accepting for MIT two gifs from America's Cup winner Bill Koch '62: a boat model of "America [Cubed]" (the winning boat designed at MIT) given to the MIT Hart Nautical Collections, and a half-scale silver model of the America's Cup Trophy given to the MIT Athletic Department.

Technology Day 1994 - "For the Wonder of it All: The Arts at MIT"

Technology Day 1994 - "For the Wonder of it All: The Arts at MIT"

MIT's Technology Day 1994 titled "For the the Wonder of it All: the Arts at MIT" takes place on June 3, 1994, and features the following presentations: Philip Morrison on “Art and Science;” I. M. Pei '40 and William Mitchell on "I. M. Pei Recent Work;" Richard Polich ML '65 on "Engineering and Art;" and Lloyd Schwartz, John Harbison and Tod Machover on "The Sounds of Music at MIT." The video includes clips of musical performances.

Technology Day 1995 - "War, Technology, Peace and Change"

Technology Day 1995 - "War, Technology, Peace and Change"

MIT's 1995 Technology Day takes place on June 16, 1995 on the theme "War, Technology, Peace and Change." A fly-by of six vintage World War II airplanes led by a B-25, intended as a tribute to the sacrifices of MIT community members in wartime service, concludes the event. Featured speakers include Doris Kearns Goodwin, “The WWII Imperative for Democracy;” Robert Seamans, “WWII Comes to MIT;” Paul Gray “MIT’s Response to the WWII Experience;” Lester Thurow, “The Economic Impact of the War on Society;” Charles M. Vest, “MIT and the Future.”

Technology Day 1996 - "Miracle or Mirage: Technology at the Horizon"

Technology Day 1996 - "Miracle or Mirage: Technology at the Horizon"

MIT's Technology Day 1996, on the theme "Miracle or Mirage: Technology at the Horizon" features speakers Bran Ferren ‘74 (”There’s No Bits like Show Bits”), David Baltimore LI ‘61 (“The Next Gene”), John Preston (“Materials: Something Old, Something New”), and Michael L. Dertouzos ‘64 (“The Information Age”). Presenter is Charles Vest.

Technology Day 1997 - "Technology At Play: The World of Sports, Games and Toys"

Technology Day 1997 - "Technology At Play: The World of Sports, Games and Toys"

MIT's 1997 Technology Day takes place on June 7, 1997 on the theme "Technology At Play: The World of Sports, Games and Toys." Speakers include Stephen C. Jacobsen ME ‘73, “On the Design and Manufacture of Some Interesting Machines;” Seymour A. Papert, “A New Look at Play as Child’s Work;” Edward F. Crawley ‘76, “Airplanes, Baseballs, and the Fun of Flight;” Woodie Flowers ME ‘73, “The Many Dimensions of Hard Fun.”

Technology Day 1998 - "Creating Wealth: Knowledge, Skills, Capital, Resources"

Technology Day 1998 - "Creating Wealth: Knowledge, Skills, Capital, Resources"

MIT's 1998 Technology Day takes place on June 6, 1998 on the theme "Creating Wealth: Knowledge, Skills, Capital, Resources." Featured speakers include Tony K. Tan PH ‘64, “Creating Wealth: A National Perspective;” Judith C. Lewent GM ‘72, “Building National Wealth Through Investment and Innovation. The Pharmaceutical Industry: A Case Study;” David H. Mark, “Wealth Creation and Global Sustainability: Important Opportunities, Increased Vulnerability;” Lester C. Thurow HM, “Building Economic Wealth in the 21st Century.”

Technology Day 1999 - "The Human Body: Emerging Medical Science and Technology"

Technology Day 1999 - "The Human Body: Emerging Medical Science and Technology"

MIT's Technology Day 1999 focused on the theme "The Human Body: Emerging Medical Science and Technology." The event, which took place on June 5, featured the following speakers and talks: Robert A. Weinberg '64, “How Cancer Begins;" Martha Constantine-Paton, “What is Development Plasticity and What Does it Do For Us?”; Robert S. Langer '74, “Biomaterials and How They Will Change Our Lives;” David C. Page, “The Human Genome Project, Sex and Infertility.”

Technology Day 2000 - "The Future of Atoms in an Age of Bits"

Technology Day 2000 - "The Future of Atoms in an Age of Bits"

MIT's Technology Day 2000, on the theme "The Future of Atoms in an Age of Bits," features speakers Rodney A. Brooks (“Flash, Machines and the Physical World”), William J. Mitchell (“E-Topia: Digital Communications and the Future of Cities”), Rosalind W. Picard (“The Emotionally Smart Machine”) and Yoseff Sheffi (“Transportation Auctions and Exchanges”). June 3, 2000.

Technology Day 2002 - "When Worlds Collide: Science, Politics and Power in the 21st Century"

Technology Day 2002 - "When Worlds Collide: Science, Politics and Power in the 21st Century"

MIT's Technology Day 2002, on the theme "When Worlds Collide: Science, Politics and Power in the 21st Century," features the following speakers: Ronald G. Prinn CM ‘71 (“From Complex Science to Contentious Policy: Lessons from Global Warming”), Daniel Charles (“The Story is Mightier Than the Data”), John M. Deutsch ‘61 (“The Struggle to Give Objective Scientific Advice in Washington”) and Shirley Malcolm (“Generation Next: What Do They Really Need to Know and How Do We Help Them Learn It?”). June 8, 2002.

The Airplane at Play - Charles S. Draper and Robert M. Love

The Airplane at Play - Charles S. Draper and Robert M. Love

Charles Stark Draper and Robert M. Love '33 give a pilot's view of early aerial acrobatics while filming a series of increasingly difficult maneuvers that culminate in a tailspin. Filmed in Framingham, MA, this footage includes cameramen Draper and Arthur Rossi and pilot C. W. Sutherland. Courtesy of MIT Museum.

The Apollo 4 Mission (1967)

The Apollo 4 Mission (1967)

This 1967 film depicts the preparation, launch and recovery of the successful flight of the first seven and one-half million pound-thrust Saturn Five vehicle with the Apollo spacecraft. The actual course of the flight is portrayed through animation. Included is color photography from inside the Saturn rings and spectacular views of the earth from an altitude of 11,000 miles. MIT is noted as one of the many research institutes across the country that contributed vitally to these accomplishments. Produced by NASA. MIT Museum Collections.

The Birth of Time-Shared Computing (1985) - Robert Fano

The Birth of Time-Shared Computing (1985) - Robert Fano

The history of time-sharing is the subject of this lecture by Robert Fano, delivered on April 30, 1985. Fano joined the MIT faculty in 1947 and from 1950 to 1953, he led the Radar Techniques Group at Lincoln Laboratory. Fano is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and the National Academy of Engineering. He is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. He received the Claude E. Shannon Award in 1976 for his work in information theory.

The Eye of a Robot: Studies in Machine Vision at MIT and TX-O Computer (1959)

The Eye of a Robot: Studies in Machine Vision at MIT and TX-O Computer (1959)

The first of two films shown here, Eye of a Robot (to 18:30) summarizes computer vision research being carried out in the 1950s at the MIT Laboratory for Artificial Intelligence, under the direction of Marvin Minsky and with Patrick Winston and Berthold Horn supervising the robotics work. The film shows how "experimental computer programs extract line drawings from pictures and use knowledge about the three-dimensional world, and also how new ideas about artificial intelligence are used in these processes." The second film is silent and shows the TX-O computer at work, e.g on a tic-tac-toe game. Courtesy of MIT Museum.

The Social Beaver (1956)

The Social Beaver (1956)

A promotional film for prospective students and visitors to MIT, The Social Beaver focuses on the community living and range of social and cultural activities that round out a student’s life at MIT, from music groups to hobby clubs, the traditional Field Day competitions and dormitory life. The film was written and directed by MIT alumnus Oscar Henry Horowitz ‘22 and features original music played by MIT Concert Band composed by Andrew Kazdin. Courtesy of the MIT Museum.

The Thinking Machine (1961)—MIT Centennial Film

The Thinking Machine (1961)—MIT Centennial Film

Screen actor David Wayne chats with MIT Professor Jerome Wiesner on developments in computer research and artificial intelligence, as part of the “Tomorrow” television series produced by CBS for MIT on occasion of MIT’s Centennial in 1961. The program features the TX-O digital computer, an instrument that for the first time is enabling scientists to explore new frontiers of the human mind by showing what machines do that looks like "thinking." We see how a computer can generate a Western story script, watch experiments in mind and computer research with children and animals, and hear a range of scientists, including Claude Shannon, Jerome Y. Lettvin, Douglas T. Ross, Ronald Melzach, Arthur L. Samuel and Barbel Inhelder state their convictions about the future role of computers in society. Film to HD transfer courtesy of MIT150. MIT Museum Collections.

Tribute Banquet in Honor of Jerome Wiesner's Retirement

Tribute Banquet in Honor of Jerome Wiesner's Retirement

The Tribute Banquet in honor of MIT President Jerome Wiesner's retirement took place on May 21, 1980. Albert G. Hill presides as master of ceremonies, and speakers include Anthony Lewis, Cecil Green, Phyllis Ann Wallace, Walter Grossman, Howard Johnson, Paul Gray, and Jerome Wiesner.

Underwater Photography (1964)—Science Reporter

Underwater Photography (1964)—Science Reporter

This black-and white film features Harold "Doc" Edgerton interviewed by John Fitch about the technology and scientific applications of underwater photography for the “MIT Science Reporter” (National Education Television, 1964). Edgerton discusses hand-held cameras and deep-sea camera instruments at the MIT Pool, and reviews examples of his underwater photography fieldwork such as searching for the lost THRESHER, and exploring the deep-sea Romanche Trench and Puerto Rico Trench. Edgerton also demonstrates his sonar “pinger” designed to track the towed underwater camera between the seabed and surface ship. The original film is a 16mm film. Courtesy of MIT Museum. To find out more about underwater photography and Doc Edgerton, see The Edgerton Digital Collections Project.

Victor Weisskopf and Philip Morrison, Compton Lecture, “Forty Years After Los Alamos: MIT and the Bomb" (1985)"

Victor Weisskopf and Philip Morrison, Compton Lecture, “Forty Years After Los Alamos: MIT and the Bomb" (1985)"

At a Karl Taylor Compton Lecture on April 17, 1985, Victor Weisskopf and Philip Morrison reflect on the topic “Forty Years After Los Alamos: MIT and the Bomb." Moderator is Francis Lowe.

Victory and Science (1945)

Victory and Science (1945)

This vintage silent film collects a range of World War II devices developed at MIT, which were on display at the campus from November 10-12, 1945. More than 75,000 people attended the event, giving the Boston-area public its first opportunity to see the wide variety of new technologies developed during the war. Film to HD transfer courtesy of MIT 150. MIT Museum Collections.

Vignettes of Early Radiation Workers (1978)

Vignettes of Early Radiation Workers (1978)

Vignettes of early radiation workers with John G. Trump, DSc Professor of electrical engineering MIT. Moderated by Lauriston S. Taylor. In his video series “Vignettes of Early Radiation Workers” Taylor interviews pioneers on topics in “fields that have impinged on the applications of ionizing radiation to diagnostic and therapeutic radiology “; Trump has been involved in the “development of high-voltage radiation producing machines making them available for research applications such as medicine”. Production date: 08/29/1978.

Woodie Flowers, Course 2.70 Introduction to Design Competition (1981)

Woodie Flowers, Course 2.70 Introduction to Design Competition (1981)

Professor Woodie Flowers, of the MIT Mechanical Engineering department, hosts the 1981 competition for the his famous "Introduction to Design" class -- perhaps MIT's most influential engineering course. The challenge is described in the syllabus: to “design and build a robotic system for putting a round peg in a square hole, while a competing system tries to put another peg into the same hole.” Known originally as Course 2.70, this particular year's competition was called "The MIT Arms Race."